An analysis of the battle of the somme in the first world war

The artillery bombardment had started on the 24th of June, expending huge amounts of shells against the German lines.

An analysis of the battle of the somme in the first world war

The introduction of aircraft into combat left soldiers and civilians vulnerable to air attacks for the first time. The first of these raids on British civilians occurred on 19 Januarywhen giant airships called Zeppelins dropped bombs on Great Yarmouth and Kings Lynn in Norfolk.

Raids on London followed throughout In springthe Germans carried out their first large-scale daylight raids involving Gotha bombers.

The most destructive of the Gotha raids took place on 13 June, when people were killed in London.

Firsts of the First World War | Imperial War Museums

Britain developed new air and civil defence measures to meet the threat of German bombers, many of which would be adapted as air attacks on civilians became a more common part of modern warfare. This trauma is not unique to the First World War, but it was during this conflict that it first came to be recognised by medical professionals and the public.

Some believed it was caused by physical damage resulting from shell explosions, but others recognised the role of a whole range of complex psychological factors and experiences. For some psychological casualties, one traumatic experience could trigger their symptoms. For others, it might be the cumulative effects of sustained battlefield service.

Symptoms varied in type and severity, and treatments developed slowly. Shell shock has become an enduring symbol of the human cost of the First World War.

Over the last century there has been a growing awareness of the psychological effects of combat. It was developed during the Napoleonic Wars and first applied systematically during the American Civil War, but it was not until the First World War that the British adopted it on a widespread basis.

A wounded soldier would be taken through a series of aid posts, dressing stations and hospitals where he received different levels of medical care. Those casualties with injuries thought to be survivable, but requiring rapid emergency treatment, were given the highest priority.

Others with more minor injuries were less pressing.

Firsts of the First World War | Imperial War Museums

Those considered to be unlikely to survive would be made as comfortable as possible but were not prioritised. Medical staff often had to make difficult decisions very quickly, but triage allowed for the continuous movement of casualties away from the battlefield and helped ensure that as many casualties received medical treatment as quickly as possible.

It remains a crucial component of front-line medicine. The British first used poison gas during the Battle of Loos pictured herebut in some sectors the wind blew the cloud back into the British lines.

Since the First World War, there have been many international laws and arms agreements intended to ban the use of chemical weapons, but they remain a controversial part of modern warfare.

First compulsory military service in Britain posters 6.

An analysis of the battle of the somme in the first world war

First compulsory military service in Britain Before the First World War there had never been compulsory military service in Britain. The first Military Service Bill was passed into law in January after the number of volunteers for the armed forces had begun to dry up in the second half of From Marchmilitary service was required of all single men in England, Scotland and Wales aged 18 to 41, except those who were in jobs essential to the war effort, the sole support of dependents, medically unfit or those who could show a conscientious objection.

Further military service laws expanded to include married men, tightened occupational exemptions and raised the age limit to Triage is the system of categorising casualties and prioritising their treatment. It was developed during the Napoleonic Wars and first applied systematically during the American Civil War, but it was not until the First World War that the British adopted it on a widespread basis.

Firsts of the First World War Tuesday 16 January This footage, taken from ’s Battle of the Somme, Gas, a type of chemical weapon, was first used on a major scale by the Germans in during the Second Battle of Ypres. The British first used poison gas during the Battle of Loos (pictured here), but in some sectors the wind.

The Battle of the Somme was fought from July 1 to November 18, during World War I (). In , the British and French intended to launch a large-scale offensive along the Somme River. In , the British and French intended to launch a large-scale offensive along the Somme River.

A multimedia history of world war one

8 things you (probably) didn’t know about the battle of the Somme One of the bloodiest clashes of the First World War, the five-month battle of the Somme – which took place between July and November – claimed the lives of more than , British soldiers, with more than 57, British casualties on the first day alone.

Using the film Battle of the Somme as a source. Produced for GCSE History students to develop source and interpretation skills, this short film shows how historians at IWM evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness, demonstrating how skills for analysis are used in the museum.

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Battle of the Somme - HISTORY